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5 Reasons Why Evans Kidero Should Not Be Re-elected


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5 Reasons Why Evans Kidero Should Not Be Re-elected

We will remember Kidero for allegedly slapping the hell out Nairobi Woman Rep Rachel Shebesh and his run-ins with Nairobi Senator, Mike Sonko Mbuvi. How about that for a good working relationship
Five years ago, we made the mistake of electing Dr Evans Kidero as Nairobi governor. This decision has haunted us ever since. We handed him one of the best jobs in the country, but it seems like he was woefully unprepared for it.

In retrospect, he was our only rational choice in 2013, the alternative would have been suicidal. We bought his hype and academic qualifications. Little did we know that he was all form and no substance.

When he came in, the first thing he did was increase parking fees. Business permit and licensing charges were almost doubled. We all hoped that with the billions, we will receive better services in the city, but the city slumped to the worst it has ever been since its inception 100 years ago.

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His name has always been associated with bad stuff. An audit adversely mentioned him in financial misappropriation at Mumias Sugar Company, he was at the centre of an alleged Sh200 million election petition bribery, while his foundation is being probed by the NGOs board. If you vote Kidero back, you’ll have yourself to blame.

Why Kidero should not be re-elected:

Tom Mboya statue

Tom Mboya’s statue is an eyesore. I can’t believe that one of Kenya’s independence heroes, a man who truly wanted the best for Kenya but erred on his judgement of the friends he kept, can be so dishonoured.

The street we named after him is deplorable – overcrowded and filthy with old buildings that should be brought down. His statue has been vandalised more than our public coffers by our politicians. Right now, it is a cesspit of disrepair and symbol of a decaying regime.

Street children

Nairobians of a certain generation may remember a time in the 2000s, when town clerk John Gakuo cleaned the mess in the city. He kicked out the faeces-wielding street children. The flying squad took down dangerous criminals, and you could actually receive a phone call in town.

Nowadays, the Nairobi CBD teems with hawkers, pickpockets, muggers, urchins and women who use their toddlers to beg. The sight of a glue-sniffing child is a reminder of a failed generation that leads this country.

Traffic

Nairobians spend a quarter of their productive days stuck in traffic, mostly inside matatus that are louder than discos. Kidero promised us the Mass Rapid Transit System (MRTS), but we ended up with more matatus on the roads instead. We need a light-rail system like yesterday. We need a governor with some imagination on how to deal with the issue.

Dirty city

Nairobi is just dirty. Both the CBD and our neighbourhoods are extremely filthy, increasingly becoming uninhabitable. Cleaning a city should have been one of the easiest jobs for any governor.

Lack of amenities

Nairobi public hospitals are in a terrible state. The city barely has enough toilets for its five million residents and sewerage virtually non-existent in some neighbourhoods. We have no playgrounds for our children and it is a shame that we have to take our children to malls, where we pay Sh700 for a ride on a horse mannequin.

We have no neighbourhood libraries. I can go on and on. The bottom line is that county government is seemingly not concerned about the welfare of people it taxes exorbitantly.

We spend a good chunk of our lives in the city and we pay dearly for it, that’s why we need a governor who can live up to our expectations.