KCSE Results 2017

How to  check for your KCSE Results 2017 via SMS and Online

This is how to check your KCSE results 2017 online and via SMS

How to Check KCSE Results 2017 via SMS

To get KCSE results 2016 by SMS send an SMS with your Index Number to 22252 for Safaricom, Airtel and Orange networks.

How to Check KCSE Results 2017 Online

To check KCSE results online, go to the KNEC website: http://www.knec-portal.ac.ke/ and enter your Index number.

KCSE Result Slip 2017

Candidates should visit their examination centers for their official results slip.

The ministry of education advises parents teachers and pupils to check the KCSE results and KCSE result slip for any anomaly such as incorrect candidate’s name, school name and code as well as wrong subject grade and report to KNEC within a month after the announcement.

Video: How to  check for your KCSE Results 2017 via SMS and Online

Fred Matiang’i Releases 2017 KCSE Exam Results

Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiangi has released the 2017 Form Four exam results.

Here are the highlights of the report released on Wednesday at the Nairobi School:

  • Overall, there is a decline in number of students who qualified to join universities, with boys performing better than girls.
  • Number of As increases to 142 from 141 in 2016.
  • A minuses reduce to 2,714 from 4,645 in 2016.
  • Pangani Girls, Nairobi, is the most improved school as Alliance Girls and Kenya High shine.
  • Knec withholds results for 10 schools pending investigations; candidates to know their fate on January 18.

The CS said there was a notable improvement in the 2017 KCSE results as compared to those of 2016 where 141 candidates got grade A.  He noted that female candidates performed better than male candidates in this year’s KCSE. Matiang’i said results from 10 secondary schools have been withheld over exam irregularities cases and the Education Ministry will give a detailed report on January 18.

The CS hailed the collaboration with the Ministry of defense and ICT Ministry played a major role in transporting exams including during the marking process. Matiang’i said President Uhuru’s directive to work with Health Ministry to register 3 million secondary school students with NHIF from January 2018 is in process.

Teachers Service Commission CEO Nancy Macharia warned that teachers found culpable of cheating during exams whether in private or public schools will be punished. She asked the Education ministry to deregister private schools that employ teachers who have been dismissed over indiscipline cases.

Macharia insisted on teachers annual appraisals, a decision that was reached at to ensure teachers took their work seriously and ensured students perform well. KNEC Chairman Prof Magoha hailed President Uhuru for his dedication and commitment to ensure Education Ministry conducts its activities smoothly.

President Uhuru Kenyatta asked the Teachers Service Commission (TSC) to reward principals, schools and subject teachers who excelled in 2017 KCSE to promote continued high performance.

He also urged Attorney General Githu Muigai to work with DPP Keriako and ensure over 700 teachers involved in exam irregularities are punished to serve as an example. ICT Cabinet Secretary Joe Mucheru acknowledged the data entry clerks for the good work they did in helping with marking of KCSE with was done within 11 days.

The 2017 KCSE exams kicked off on November 6 to the 29th and took a record 11 days of marking, a difference from previous years where results were announced in February. Candidates are getting their results just 21 days after completion. A total of 615,773 candidates sat for the exam this year compared to 577,253 candidates who wrote the KCSE exams in 2016.

Comparison of KCSE 2017 and KCSE 2016 Results

KCSE Results 2017 Summary

  1. A (Plain) – 142
  2. A- (Minus) – 2,714
  3. B+ (Plus) – 7,344
  4. B (Plain) – 12,628
  5. B- (Minus) – 19,385
  6. C+ (Plus) – 27,860
  7. C (Plain) – 40,474
  8. C- (Minus) – 61,040
  9. D+ (Plus) – 88,447
  10. D (Plain) – 135,550
  11. D- (Minus) – 179,381
  12. E – 35,536

KCSE Results 2016 Summary

  1. A (Plain) – 141
  2. A- (Minus) – 4,645
  3. B+ (Plus) – 10,975
  4. B (Plain) – 17,261
  5. B- (Minus) – 23,745
  6. C+ (Plus) – 32,207
  7. C (Plain) – 44,792
  8. C- (Minus) – 61,026
  9. D+ (Plus) – 80,952
  10. D (Plain) – 112,135
  11. D- (Minus) – 149,929
  12. E – 33,399

Best Top 100 Students in KCSE Results 2017

PSN INDEX NO CANDIDATE’S NAME GEN PERF.
INDEX
SCHOOL COUNTY
1 20400006001 KIRIMI NAOMI KAWIRA F 87.011 PANGANI GIRLS NAIROBI
2 26500001016 SHARON JEPCHUMBA F 86.83 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
3 11200001012 KAMAU BRIAN MAINA M 86.757 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
4 20400001005 KUT DONATA ODERO M 86.561 LENANA SCHOOL NAIROBI
5 11200006002 MUUTU HARRIET MUEKE F 85.956 MARYHILL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
6 44700006010 BRIAN ONGIRI ONKUNDI M 85.944 KANGA HIGH MIGORI
7 20400006009 MORARA MONGINA DEFENCE F 85.91 PANGANI GIRLS NAIROBI
8 20400006011 MWATATE EMILY SARU F 85.883 PANGANI GIRLS NAIROBI
9 26500001004 WAHOME SHERRY WANJIKU F 85.869 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
10 42700005015 ONYANGO STANLEY OMONDI M 85.853 MARANDA HIGH SIAYA
11 20400003011 ONYORE HILLARY LAURYN AKINYI F 85.851 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NAIROBI
12 20400003001 KONYANGO WANDA TREZER F 85.823 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NAIROBI
13 20400003006 SHIKUKU MARIE KHALAI F 85.801 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NAIROBI
14 20400004001 RAJIV YUSSUF ALI M 85.797 STAREHE BOYS’ CENTRE & SCHOOL NAIROBI
15 26500001013 OCHIENG’ QUIVERLINE ATIENO F 85.717 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
16 20404006007 ODERO BAXTER ODONGO M 85.684 LIGHT ACADEMY NAIROBI
17 27552001015 CHEPTALAM ALEX KIPKORIR M 85.614 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
18 40700002014 MASENO SIKWEYA MORRIS M 85.514 KISII HIGH KISII
19 11200005001 MWAMBEGU UCHI JOYCE F 85.063 LORETO HIGH SCHOOL LIMURU KIAMBU
20 20400008001 KIBICHO EMMANUEL MURAGE M 85.057 MOI FORCES ACADEMY – NAIROBI NAIROBI
21 11200005004 MPEKETHU UNITER RIZIKI F 85.031 LORETO HIGH SCHOOL LIMURU KIAMBU
22 11200005011 BOGOMBA YVETTE F 84.971 LORETO HIGH SCHOOL LIMURU KIAMBU
23 23500014001 MUHOHO JAMES CHEGE M 84.943 ST. JOSEPH’S BOYS HIGH SCHOOL – KITALE TRANSNZOIA
24 10227301001 OCHIENG IAN DUNCAN M 84.873 NJIIRI SCHOOL MURANG’A
25 26500001001 OGINDO VICTORIA AKEYO F 84.869 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
26 11200001006 GARIY SAMUEL OTIENO M 84.863 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
27 11200006030 CHEPKEMBOI CAROLYNE F 84.86 MARYHILL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
28 44700006002 MANOA TOBIAS MURIMI M 84.811 KANGA HIGH MIGORI
29 28522505001 BENARD KIPKOECH M 84.801 LITEIN HIGH SCHOOL KERICHO
30 44700006016 AKINYI AUSTINE OTIENO M 84.794 KANGA HIGH MIGORI
31 36600004001 WANYAMA WEKESA MOSES M 84.784 FRIENDS KAMUSINGA BUNGOMA
32 11200002003 ADHIAMBO CYNTHIA F 84.777 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
33 20406020001 GITAHI BRIAN NJOROGE M 84.773 STRATHMORE SCHOOL NAIROBI
34 11200002013 NABANGALA M QUIRINE F 84.766 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
35 11200001027 OKITA SWAIB OUMA M 84.763 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
36 43700008001 MABIRIA ZOTEL BUNDUKI M 84.759 NYAMBARIA HIGH SCHOOL NYAMIRA
37 11200002033 ONARE FAITH JOAL F 84.741 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
38 26500001022 ODHIAMBO JACKLYNE ACHIENG F 84.727 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
39 11200002006 NYAIM JANE AWUOR F 84.724 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
40 26500001007 WASWA N. RACHAEL F 84.714 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
40 42700005048 KABATHA ROBERT KARAYA M 84.714 MARANDA HIGH SIAYA
42 39700001007 AMOS KIBIWOTT CHUMBA M 84.697 MASENO SCHOOL KISUMU
43 11200002048 MICH AWOUR JANE F 84.69 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
44 11200001010 NGOBI IAN LEE M 84.687 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
45 11200003012 KIMIRI DENNIS MWAI M 84.684 MANGU HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
45 20406015003 GATHIRWA NICOLE NJERI F 84.684 CONSOLATA SCHOOL NAIROBI
47 10200008003 ITHAGU STANLEY KINYA M 84.681 MURANGA HIGH MURANG’A
48 37600001001 FREDRICK OMONDI ODUOR M 84.667 KAKAMEGA SCHOOL KAKAMEGA
49 11200002005 NYAKUNDI DAISY GESARE F 84.659 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
50 20400002003 CHUNE NICHOLAS STAM KHATAKA M 84.643 NAIROBI SCHOOL NAIROBI
51 07200009002 ODUOR ADHIAMBO PHYLLIS F 84.641 KARIMA GIRLS NYANDARUA
52 27552001001 MAHMOUD HUSSEIN FUAAD M 84.617 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
53 20406020025 NYAGA PHIL NJUE M 84.616 STRATHMORE SCHOOL NAIROBI
54 20400002005 NJOROGE FELIX MBURU M 84.607 NAIROBI SCHOOL NAIROBI
55 11200005020 EDITH WAYUA NGUNDI F 84.603 LORETO HIGH SCHOOL LIMURU KIAMBU
56 11200002062 AGALA CAREN KHAVUKUI F 84.581 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
57 11200002010 OTIENO AKOTH DAPHNE F 84.569 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
58 11200002052 KINGORI GATHUNGO F 84.56 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
59 20404006012 MWEU KELLY CHANGILWA M 84.549 LIGHT ACADEMY NAIROBI
60 11200002054 MUCHIRI MELLISA WANJIRU F 84.539 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
61 20400003054 WAINAINA S SALAMA F 84.536 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NAIROBI
62 11200002008 NYANG’OR BERACAH MAY F 84.533 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
63 40700002011 VINCENT OBONYO BOSIRE M 84.511 KISII HIGH KISII
64 11200003031 HARON GUCHU GITAU M 84.49 MANGU HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
65 20400003022 MULUNDA RACHEL TUZO F 84.484 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NAIROBI
66 44700006011 OGUTU JEAN BARON M 84.047 KANGA HIGH MIGORI
67 20400006019 NADABHA NADINE ANGELA F 84.02 PANGANI GIRLS NAIROBI
68 42700005007 OKUMU LEVIS OMONDI M 83.906 MARANDA HIGH SIAYA
69 39700001004 KIPROTICH NATHAN M 83.893 MASENO SCHOOL KISUMU
70 11200006001 GICHOHI STACY MWONGELI F 83.88 MARYHILL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
71 27552001003 ESHIBUKHO DIANA ASIKO F 83.874 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
72 40700002004 WALTER OLUOCH OCHIENG M 83.846 KISII HIGH KISII
73 08200007001 MUCHIRI MOSES NJOROGE M 83.84 KAGUMO HIGH NYERI
74 11200002001 CHEPKORIR DORCAS CHERUIYOT F 83.833 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
75 36600002001 KIPRUTO JEPTARUS LINNET F 83.823 LUGULU GIRLS BUNGOMA
76 11200001022 CHUPHI JOSIAH KAFUTA M 83.816 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
77 11200003002 MATHU BRANDON M 83.813 MANGU HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
78 27538204001 KORIR LILIAN CHEPKOECH F 83.809 MARY MOUNT SECONDARY SCHOOL NAKURU
79 27552001008 BETT JADIEL KIPKOSGEI M 83.794 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
80 27552001012 VERNON IPOMAI M 83.793 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
81 40700002003 ORINA JUNIOR SAMUEL M 83.777 KISII HIGH KISII
82 40727101002 LAMECH NYANCHA MAIRURA M 83.774 RIOKINDO HIGH SEC SCHOOL KISII
83 42700005010 DAVID FAVOUR MUTUMA M 83.766 MARANDA HIGH SIAYA
84 11200006003 OBASI KEMUNTO FELISTER F 83.739 MARYHILL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
85 11200002119 FAISAL ZAMZAM LEKORERE F 83.736 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
85 26500001006 NGUGI CHRISTINE NYAMBURA F 83.736 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
87 10227301010 WAMONDO ENOCH MWANGI M 83.727 NJIIRI SCHOOL MURANG’A
88 11200001038 NYARIBO DAN FRANK M 83.726 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
89 20400002040 MUTHAMA BRIAN MUTAVA M 83.724 NAIROBI SCHOOL NAIROBI
90 26500001014 MELVIN ATIENO LUCAS F 83.714 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET UASIN GISHU
90 42700005064 IVIA ROY NGONDI M 83.714 MARANDA HIGH SIAYA
90 28522505010 BOWEN EMMANUEL CHEBEREK M 83.714 LITEIN HIGH SCHOOL KERICHO
93 29500006007 KARISA  BIRYA SULEIMAN M 83.707 KAPSABET BOYS NANDI
94 27552001002 RUGUT FAITH JEPKOSGEI F 83.703 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
95 41710301011 AOMO OTIENO FELIX M 83.699 AGORO SARE HIGH SCHOOL HOMA BAY
96 07200009007 CHEGE LUCY WAITHERA F 83.693 KARIMA GIRLS NYANDARUA
97 41742105002 OTIENO ANDREA MILLENIA M 83.687 ORERO BOYS SECONDARY SCHOOL HOMA BAY
98 27552001011 POIPOI TIMOTHY M 83.683 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
99 27552001009 KANGANGI MARVIN CHOMBA M 83.673 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK NAKURU
100 11200002046 NZINGA BERNICE MWATHA F 83.671 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL KIAMBU
SUMMARY : BOYS : 54 GIRLS : 46  

KCSE Results 2017: Top Secondary Schools in KCSE 2017

Girls’ schools dominated the top positions in this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education examinations.

Here are the top 100 schools in KCSE results 2017

PSN CODE SCHOOL CATEGORY ENTRY PERF.INDEX COUNTY
1 34518102 SING’ORE GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 271 69.98921 ELGEYO MARAKWET
2 03121102 LIGHT ACADEMY PRIVATE 28 69.139142 MOMBASA
3 11200002 ALLIANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 394 68.682677 KIAMBU
4 20400003 THE KENYA HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 298 68.242429 NAIROBI
5 11200005 LORETO HIGH SCHOOL LIMURU NATIONAL 261 68.134544 KIAMBU
6 07214117 KISIMA MIXED SECONDARY SCHOOL PRIVATE 39 67.784538 NYANDARUA
7 26500001 MOI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL- ELDORET NATIONAL 289 67.526491 UASIN GISHU
8 29500006 KAPSABET BOYS NATIONAL 311 67.402749 NANDI
9 11200001 ALLIANCE HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 374 67.356959 KIAMBU
10 20400006 PANGANI GIRLS NATIONAL 281 66.22232 NAIROBI
11 27552001 MOI HIGH SCHOOL KABARAK PRIVATE 338 66.004443 NAKURU
12 24505104 KAPENGURIA BOYS HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 241 65.956066 WEST POKOT
13 20406020 STRATHMORE SCHOOL PRIVATE 88 65.926329 NAIROBI
14 11200003 MANGU HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 299 65.23101 KIAMBU
15 36600004 FRIENDS KAMUSINGA NATIONAL 275 65.053389 BUNGOMA
16 37632101 CHEBUYUSI BOYS HIGH SCHOOL COUNTY 190 64.412105 KAKAMEGA
17 20404006 LIGHT ACADEMY PRIVATE 100 64.38264 NAIROBI
18 08200007 KAGUMO HIGH NATIONAL 277 64.337451 NYERI
19 20400002 NAIROBI SCHOOL NATIONAL 356 64.314224 NAIROBI
20 28512112 MOI TEA GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 134 64.308268 KERICHO
21 42700005 MARANDA HIGH NATIONAL 493 64.239186 SIAYA
22 20405004 PRECIOUS BLOOD RIRUTA EXTRA COUNTY 151 64.190701 NAIROBI
23 23500014 ST. JOSEPH’S BOYS HIGH SCHOOL – KITALE NATIONAL 477 63.660849 TRANSNZOIA
24 28500005 KIPSIGIS GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 239 63.517974 KERICHO
25 20406008 KIANDA SCHOOL PRIVATE 53 63.417754 NAIROBI
26 24504201 ORTUM SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 320 63.389806 WEST POKOT
27 20400004 STAREHE BOYS’ CENTRE & SCHOOL NATIONAL 254 62.776007 NAIROBI
28 26509186 SEGERO ADVENTIST ACADEMY PRIVATE 32 62.735687 UASIN GISHU
29 11200006 MARYHILL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 324 62.734972 KIAMBU
30 28522505 LITEIN HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 269 62.202189 KERICHO
31 10208311 PIONEER SCHOOL PRIVATE 270 62.184666 MURANG’A
32 44700006 KANGA HIGH NATIONAL 291 61.934065 MIGORI
33 39700001 MASENO SCHOOL NATIONAL 343 61.879985 KISUMU
34 27538102 ELBURGON SECONDARY SCHOOL SUB COUNTY 132 61.785924 NAKURU
35 10200008 MURANGA HIGH NATIONAL 259 61.514162 MURANG’A
36 40727101 RIOKINDO HIGH SEC SCHOOL COUNTY 117 60.830948 KISII
37 34500010 ST PATRICK ITEN NATIONAL 207 60.746642 ELGEYO MARAKWET
38 20400009 STAREHE GIRLS’ CENTRE NATIONAL 115 60.563652 NAIROBI
39 11200004 LIMURU GIRLS’ SCHOOL NATIONAL 278 60.209165 KIAMBU
40 27500009 NAKURU GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 228 59.944179 NAKURU
41 27536119 ANESTAR BOYS HIGH SCHOOL PRIVATE 66 59.874424 NAKURU
42 27500002 NAKURU HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 241 59.834705 NAKURU
43 40700002 KISII HIGH NATIONAL 352 59.705002 KISII
44 44729101 AGENG’A SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNTY 113 59.696946 MIGORI
45 44736101 ST JOSEPH’S RAPOGI SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 304 59.648523 MIGORI
46 38600003 BUNYORE GIRLS NATIONAL 292 59.497294 VIHIGA
47 14333201 KYENI GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 146 59.467287 EMBU
48 31557202 MAASAI HIGH SCHOOL PRIVATE 21 59.247523 KAJIADO
49 03121101 SHEIKH KHALIFA BIN ZAYED AL- NAHYAN PRIVATE 214 59.080168 MOMBASA
50 10227301 NJIIRI SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 364 58.660376 MURANG’A
51 41710301 AGORO SARE HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 308 58.584558 HOMA BAY
52 41700004 ASUMBI GIRLS NATIONAL 338 58.519591 HOMA BAY
53 11211340 HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL, LIMURU PRIVATE 87 58.183988 KIAMBU
54 41742105 ORERO BOYS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 280 58.125267 HOMA BAY
55 13302102 ST CHARLES LWANGA SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 139 58.076446 KITUI
56 27536129 ANESTAR BOYS HIGH SCH – LANET PRIVATE 84 57.922023 NAKURU
57 08237012 MAHIGA GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 198 57.822828 NYERI
58 39700009 KISUMU GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 285 57.735891 KISUMU
59 12301771 ALIM HIGH SCHOOL PRIVATE 80 57.72315 MACHAKOS
60 23500003 ST BRIGIDS KIMININI NATIONAL 226 57.672252 TRANSNZOIA
61 20403007 DON BOSCO SECONDARY SCHOOL PRIVATE 46 57.633173 NAIROBI
62 27500008 UTUMISHI BOYS ACADEMY NATIONAL 266 57.630883 NAKURU
63 08200010 BISHOP GATIMU NGANDU GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 268 57.245925 NYERI
64 30544102 MARY MOTHER OF GRACE SECONDARY SCHOOL PRIVATE 28 57.230464 LAIKIPIA
65 20401011 WAMY HIGH SCHOOL PRIVATE 110 57.122036 NAIROBI
66 34559502 METKEI SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 130 56.794292 ELGEYO MARAKWET
67 03106120 ABU HUREIRA ACADEMY PRIVATE 53 56.562471 MOMBASA
68 12300001 MACHAKOS BOYS NATIONAL 218 56.492752 MACHAKOS
69 18336101 PRECIOUS BLOOD SEC.SCHOOL – KILUNGU EXTRA COUNTY 95 56.482021 MAKUENI
70 27536202 BAHATI GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 195 56.21702 NAKURU
71 36600002 LUGULU GIRLS NATIONAL 302 56.199076 BUNGOMA
72 11236101 ST.FRANCIS GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL (MANG’U) EXTRA COUNTY 170 56.140958 KIAMBU
73 27538208 MOLO ACADEMY EXTRA COUNTY 159 56.133968 NAKURU
74 30500020 NJONJO GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 164 55.948146 LAIKIPIA
75 27538204 MARY MOUNT SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 156 55.786198 NAKURU
76 29513101 KAPSABET GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 204 55.724735 NANDI
77 08202001 NYERI HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 205 55.70698 NYERI
78 39734405 CHEMELIL SUGAR ACADEMY PRIVATE 94 55.615159 KISUMU
79 09200011 KABARE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 197 55.574416 KIRINYAGA
80 31500011 MOI GIRLS ISINYA NATIONAL 162 55.422734 KAJIADO
81 43700008 NYAMBARIA HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 337 55.406813 NYAMIRA
82 20408027 NEWLIGHT SENIOR BOYS SCHOOL PRIVATE 26 55.359769 NAIROBI
83 03106119 QUBAA MUSLIM SCHOOL PRIVATE 45 55.340177 MOMBASA
84 13300005 MUTHALE GIRLS NATIONAL 189 55.284423 KITUI
85 14300006 MOI HIGH MBIRURI NATIONAL 204 55.263122 EMBU
86 22526101 ST. THERESA’S GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL PRIVATE 37 54.879702 SAMBURU
87 19300010 IKUU BOYS HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 175 54.833628 THARAKANITHI
88 24500022 CHEWOYET HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL 268 54.783981 WEST POKOT
89 37600001 KAKAMEGA SCHOOL NATIONAL 296 54.768472 KAKAMEGA
90 20410001 MOI GIRLS’ SCHOOL NAIROBI EXTRA COUNTY 265 54.759592 NAIROBI
91 20406015 CONSOLATA SCHOOL PRIVATE 68 54.500897 NAIROBI
92 18300003 MAKUENI BOYS NATIONAL 225 54.402835 MAKUENI
93 15300012 ST. MARY’S GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL IGOJI NATIONAL 201 54.310308 MERU
94 39741005 KISUMU BOYS HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 252 54.256361 KISUMU
95 43706117 ST. PETER’S NYAKEMINCHA SEC SCH SUB COUNTY 128 54.221273 NYAMIRA
96 20404013 NAIROBI MUSLIM ACADEMY PRIVATE 97 54.184597 NAIROBI
97 40735201 ST. CHARLES LWANGA ICHUNI GIRLS HIGH EXTRA COUNTY 191 54.161795 KISII
98 40732120 NYABISASE MIXED SECONDARY SCHOOL SUB COUNTY 88 54.129 KISII
99 42721202 RAMBA SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 366 54.12298 SIAYA
100 13302103 ST. ANGELA’S GIRLS SECONDARY SCHOOL EXTRA COUNTY 168 54.120232 KITUI

Why candidates failed 2017 KCSE tests en masse – examiners

The mass failure by candidates in last year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examination has been attributed to misunderstanding of questions.

In their report, examiners noted that most answers to questions requiring elaborate responses were inadequate.

“The examiners reported that some of the questions that tested candidates’ ability to DISCUSS or EXPLAIN certain concepts that they had learnt were poorly answered, with many candidates either listing or providing sketchy answers,” Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i said during the release of the results at Nairobi School on Wednesday.

Dr Matiang’i said although the ministry and the Kenya National Examinations Council have yet to carry out an elaborate assessment to find out the reasons for the poor response to these type of questions, examiners had pointed out that many candidates relied heavily on sketchy revision books and past papers during their revision.

Such revision books and past papers don’t contain detailed explanations.

KCSE 2017 Failure – Reasons

A report on the 2014, 2015 and 2016 KCSE examination released by the ministry of Education this year identified use of sheng (colloquial language), failure to follow instructions, poor time management and rush to answer questions before understanding them, as some of the reasons for failure by students.

It also found out that some students were failing because of inadequate language skills.

“With the government’s plan to supply textbooks directly to schools, candidates should be adequately prepared to answer questions in all areas appropriately,” Dr Matiang’i noted.

KCSE 2017 Failure – Textbooks

He said the ministry was determined to ensure that every child accesses relevant reading and learning materials.

“For this reason, the ministry has come up with a direct-to-school policy on book distribution that will ensure our public schools attain the 1:1 book ratio.

“This will also eliminate middle men who collude with corrupt school officials to steal from the government and our children.

“Because textbooks will bear the “Not-for-Sale” label, this policy will help us to curb piracy, which has cost the government billions of shillings in revenue,” the CS said.

Thousands miss out on varsities over poor KCSE 2017 Results

Hundreds of thousands of this year’s Form Four leavers have been locked out of universities and other tertiary institutions.

The Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) test results released on Wednesday by Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i indicate that only 70,073 out of the 611,952 candidates – just 11.5 per cent — managed the minimum university entry qualification of mean grade C+.

In 2016, some 88,929 qualified. And, for the second year running, private universities and colleges have been thrown into a crisis for lack of students. The more than 70 universities have a capacity of over 100,000.

KCSE Results 2017 – Universities

Performance in the KCSE exam remained almost unchanged this year and in 2016.

There were 142 (0.02 per cent) candidates who obtained an overall mean grade A in the 2017 exam compared to 141 (0.02 per cent) last year.

Last year, Kenya Universities and Colleges Central Placement Service (KUCCPS) placed 71,089 students in public universities while 17,368 joined private universities.

Most of the more than 31 public universities that have been relying on parallel students will once again go back to the drawing board.

Parallel students pay more fees compared to regular ones, which the universities use to fund their development activities.

KCSE Results 2017  – Teachers Union

Private universities, which have also invested heavily in a bid to enhance capacity, will once again miss students.

Kenya Union of Post-Primary Education Teachers (Kuppet) Secretary-General Akelo Misori dismissed the results, saying Dr Matiang’i’s focus was to deny private universities and colleges students.

The unionist said teachers’ colleges and Kenya Medical Training Colleges will not get students, adding that the CS was more focused on administration of national examinations than its credibility.

Kenya National Union of Teachers (Knut) Secretary-General Wilson Sossion echoed Mr Misori’s sentiments.

KCSE Results 2017 – Enrolment

Public universities have spent massive resources, most of it borrowed, to set up hundreds of satellite campuses to cater for the demand for higher education, which has been surging every year with thousands registering, especially for evening classes.

However, several universities have closed down a number of satellite campuses for lack of students. The institutions have also hired hundreds of part-time lecturers to teach Module 2 programmes. This means thousands of lecturers and other workers will lose their jobs as the institutions lay off staff.

KCSE Results 2017 – Jobs

Only 142 candidates scored A, 2,714 A-, 7,344 B+, 12,628 B, 19,385 B- and 27,860 C+. These are the ones who will go to university.

The candidates with C totalled 40,474 as 61,040 scored C-, 88,447 D+, 135,550 D, 179,381 D- and 35,536 E.

This means that more than half of the candidates scored D and below and cannot pursue any professional courses. They cannot also join the security forces or the teaching profession.

To join the security forces, D+ is the minimum grade while those who want to be P1 teachers must have scored C plain, or D+ for early childhood development education (ECDE) tutors.

KCSE Results 2017 – Exam Marking

The low scorers will have to scramble for limited vocational training slots.

Last year, 141 candidates scored A, 4,645 had A-, 10,975 B+, 17,216 B, 23,745 B-, 32,207 C+, 44,792 C, 61,026 C-, 80,951 D+, 112,135 D, 149,929 D- and 33,399 E.

Dr Matiang’i raised his concerns over poor performance in the examination but assured Kenyans that the tough measures that he introduced to fight cheating will be sustained.

Kenya National Examinations Council (Knec) Chairman George Magoha defended the results, saying due process was followed as marking of the scripts was done with due diligence.

Prof Magoha said marking was done in 25 centres in Nairobi so that Knec could monitor them on a daily basis.

Education Principal Secretary Belio Kipsang proclaimed: “Our biggest investment has been in ICT.”

Majority of 2017 KCSE candidates scored D plus and below

Nearly three-quarters of the candidates who sat the 2017 Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) exam scored a D + (plus) and below.

Of the 615,772 candidates who wrote this year’s KCSE exam, 438,914 had a D plus and below with only 176,858 scoring a C minus and above, a jaw-dropping 71%.

Only 70,073 candidates attained the university entry grade of C+ and above compared to 88,929 the previous year.

In this year’s exam, 540,428 candidates (90%) scored between grade E and C plain compared to 482,232 last year.

A majority of the candidates (179,381) had a D minus, a mind blowing dismal performance that has raised eyebrows and formed debate on various fronts including the political sphere.

How boys beat girls in the 2017 KCSE examinations

The number of girls who attained the minimum grade C+ required for university admission nearly halved in this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examinations, putting to question the Ministry of Education’s assertion that girls had pipped their male counterparts in the exams.

The results, which Education secretary Fred Matiang’i released on Wednesday, show that only 28,386 girls scored the C+ and above required for university admission, down from 50,415 that made the cut last year – representing a 43.7 per cent drop.

The number of boys who qualified for university admission on the other hand went up by 904 to 41,687 from 40,783 last year – or 59.49 per cent of the total students who qualified for university enrolment.

While releasing the results, Dr Matiang’i commended female candidates for sterling performance, saying they had outshone the boys. Kenya on Thursday woke up to a fierce social media war as parents, students and the general public interrogated the numbers only to find a completely different picture.

Dr Matiang’i’s observation may have been rooted in the fact that girls comprised six out of the 10 top scorers and 11 out of the top 20 students nationally.

Girls’ schools also dominated the top 10 places, led by Pangani Girls, which was flagged out as most improved school.

Alliance Girls High School, which finished in position three, had the highest number of ‘A’s (16) followed by Kenya High (position 4), which had 10.

Overall, 70,073 of the 610,501 candidates met the C+ threshold for university enrolment — an 18,000 drop from last year when 88,929 candidates made the cut.

KCSE Results 2017: How KCSE 2017 was Marked

Teachers picked to mark this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examinations were first made to sit the same papers they were to mark.

Unlike in the past when the selected national markers would sit down with the setter of the papers to discuss the answers, this time round, the markers’s proficiency was tested by the Kenya National Examination Council (Knec) chiefs.

Reliable sources at the national marking centres narrated to The Standard how markers for respective papers were tested for proficiency before being allowed to proceed with the exercise.

A senior KCSE marker who took part in the examinations said those who failed to score at least 95 per cent were discontinued. The rules were very tight for key subjects such as Maths and English, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

KCSE Results 2017 Marking Pre-qualification

“The overriding concern was that there was no way a marker who did not get all the answers right could mark the paper,” he told The Standard in Kisumu yesterday.

Not even the chief examiner was spared. Sources disclosed they were the first to sit the KCSE papers in a process dubbed pre-qualification.

The exercise took four days after the selected markers reported to the various national marking stations.

The chief examiner’s test was marked by the setter before he administered the same test to all his assistants.

After that, he met the assistant chief examiners (ACEs) to discuss the paper and the marking scheme. This was done to allow the chief and ACEs to agree on the marking procedure.

“Thereafter, they met the various team leaders numbering about 100 to discuss the paper and then, under the guidance of chief examiners and ACEs, conducted the same tests on the team leaders,” he said.

The team leaders’ tests were marked by the ACEs who then retreated to discuss each question and possible answers alongside those prescribed in the marking schemes for any necessary amendments.

It is after this that the close to 1,200 markers were asked to report to the marking centres and made to sit the paper.

Team leaders were divided into about six or eight groups, whose members were expected to mark about 580 papers per person.

The markers and the team leaders also had to discuss the questions and their answers as provided in the marking schemes.

During the discussions, markers were allowed to include alternative answers that were not in the marking schemes, like methods used in calculations.

The markers were then subjected to marking of dummies or photocopies of the papers.

These dummies had already been marked by chief examiners, ACEs and team leaders and common scores arrived at.

Each of the markers are required to state how they arrived at each of the marks awarded to the candidates. Time is then allowed for criticism.

After marking about 12 dummies, the examiners would then again sit for a pre-test.

At this stage, they were expected to mark at least three dummies to be recorded as pre-test.

Again, the outcome was discussed with each of the team leaders. After the pre-test, the papers were remarked again to ascertain if the marks awarded were right.

The purpose of remarking was to ascertain if the candidate deserved what the examiners had given. For instance, if a marker gave a candidate 60 or 80 per cent, would a remark reproduce the same score if done by a new examiner?

In the event the marks deviated, the markers would be disqualified and requested to leave.

The rule of thumb was that there was no way a paper could be marked by about eight people producing similar results only for one person to deviate.

It is after this process that the examiners were subjected to ‘live or real papers’ to mark under very close or tight supervision of team leaders and ACEs.

Marking is done under close surveillance of CCTVs.

No examiner or marker is allowed during this period to access the marking centre with his phone until after 11pm in the night for the entire period.

Examiners were also not allowed to carry electronic gadgets like laptops and tablets to the marking centres.

Marking hours were strictly set to between 7am and 7pm. Only in special cases did marking go beyond these hours, and if it did, the chief examiner was required to liaise with Knec for extension.

In some cases, marking began at 5pm and was extended to 11pm in others with a 10-20 minute break for tea, lunch and supper.

KCSE Results 2017 – Cross-checking

Each paper, sources revealed, was marked in red first by the examiners, then marked again in green by the various team leaders.

Subsequently, it is marked in black by the assistant chief examiners or markers and then by the chief examiners for each of the subjects.

This was after the papers had been cross-checked by various team leaders for audit of the marks awarded. It was then that the marks were entered into the mark sheet.

It was at this point that a packet containing the particulars of each centre was given to the examiners and passed on to another team to cross-check the marks.

Only after this were the marks keyed into a computer.

Access to the IT room where the results are keyed in was restricted. Not even the chief examiner could access this room.

The mark sheets and keyed in marks are then returned to the markers to cross check whether what was keyed into the data base is what they awarded.

KCSE Results 2017 – Red ink

Upon certification, the markers and ACEs will append their signatures using red inked pens, team leaders in green and the chief examiner in blue.

Only then is the mark sheet qualified as properly done.

In the event the marks are not properly entered or are incorrect, the immediate attention of the chief examiner is sought.

This is to allow him to sign a form allowing changes to be made.

Sources revealed within the marking centres, KNEC set up a surveillance office, where the process was keenly monitored.

Girls Turn Tables On Boys In Kcse 2017 Results

The KCSE 2017 results announced Wednesday was dramatic change of fortunes to the performance posted by the same class in the 2013 KCPE. Back then, the list of top ten pupils had more boys than girls. Fast forward to 2017, the top two students are girls.

Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i while announcing the results on Wednesday said female candidates performed better than male candidates.

Alliance Girls and Kenya High School were ranked the top schools, while Pangani Girls was the most improved school.

Back in 2013 when the class sat for their KCPE, it was Brian Kimutai and Otieno Akoth who topped in the country with 444 marks.

It was also stated that fewer candidates have qualified to proceed to the university this year

KCSE Results 2017: Results for 10 schools withheld over exam malpractice

Ten schools will miss the 2017 KCSE examination results following suspected malpractice in the institutions.

“Withholding results of the schools because we want further analysis. Our examiners noted clear evidence of collusion,” Education CS Fred Matiang’i said.

Speaking at Nairobi School on Wednesday, Matiang’i said an team has been setup to scrutinise results that be released on January 18.

“I know people will ask us to prove this allegations and that is why we have asked for more expertise,” he said.

Matiang’i narrated how one school in the Rift valley engaged them in frustrating behaviours during the exams.

“They have engaged in frustrating malpractice. Every senior officer went to that school because of the problems we had,” he said.

“The principal of this school took the cell phones and put them in a bucket of water. It indicates their desperate efforts,” he said.

Matiang’i said the board of the school will be de-registered and did not name the schools affected.

KCSE 2017 Results: Teachers involved in exam irregularities facing de-registration

40 teachers face de-registration should they be found guilty of engaging in exam irregularities.

This was revealed by Teachers Service Commission CEO Nancy Macharia during release of this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education exam results at Nairobi School.

“We will take stern action against them. We shall dismiss and de-register them so that they do not step in any our schools in Kenya either in public or private schools.” warned Macharia

The TSC boss further put on notice teachers in private schools saying that they are subject to the law, warning to de-register those found to be abetting cheating.

On his part, Education Cabinet Secretary Dr. Fred Matiang’i attributed this behavior to teacher’s failure to teach their students.

“Some of our teachers are not teaching and so exam time becomes a desperate time.” Said Matiang’i

Matiang’i further issued a warning to private schools saying that if they are found to have hired a de-registered teacher, the institution would also be de-registered.

“We will pursue these cases and we will act without mercy. We will not compromise on the quality of education of our children.” Said the CS

The TSC boss also intimated that re-organization of school heads has been completed and teachers in primary and secondary schools who have stayed in one station for 9 years and above will be moved.

KCSE 2017 Results: Top performers speak of how they ensured they replicated their success

What do this year’s leading KCSE girl and boy have in common?

Top Students in KCSE 2017 Results:
Top Students in KCSE 2017 Results:

Naomi Kawira Kirimi of Pangani Girls and Alliance High School’s Kamau Brian Maina both registered sterling performance in the 2013 Kenya Certificate of Primary Education.

Naomi scored 422 marks at Chogoria Primary School while Brian registered 407 marks in his KCPE exam.

Wednesday, Meru was in the news again as it produced the top student nationally. Kirimi hails from Meru.

Naomi was overwhelmed with joy as soon as news came in that she topped with a score of 87.011 points.

But performance by Mt Kenya East regional giants was lacklustre with only three schools making it to the top 100 school nationally.

KCSE 2017 Results: Second best

Just last month, another Meru girl – Sharon Nkatha Murega of Kathingiri Primary School – a public school – emerged the second best student in KCPE exam.

Speaking at the Chogoria Mission Hospital in Tharaka Nithi County where her mother works as a nurse, Naomi said she did not expect to be the top nationally.

The family hails from Kithurine, South Imenti in the neighbouring Meru County.

Her father Kirimi Murungi is a teacher at Kinoru Primary School in Meru town.

She said she could not believe she was the top students but hundreds of friends and family members who called her made her believe the good news.

“l trusted in God, l was focused and determined, l really worked hard and concentrated. I expected good results but honestly, l did not expect to be the first in the country. It was such a shock,” she said.

The calm but jovial girl said she wants to pursue Civil Engineering at the University of Nairobi.

Her mother Jane Kirimi thanked God for the success.

“She was hardworking and an obedient girl who is always serious with her work. She was determined and even contacted her teachers when on holiday to consult them,” said Mrs Kirimi.

The same winning spirit was Wednesday evident in Brian.

Dressed in a red tie, white shirt and black suit, one can tell from first glance the 17-year-old is a young man who has his life in check.

To Brian’s teachers and parents, however, Brian’s emergence as the top boy in Alliance High School and the entire country is not shocking.

“We were talking Wednesday and I joked to him that he might easily top the country,” stated Brian’s excited father, Dr Gideon Maina, who also happens to be an alumnus of the Alliance.

Nevertheless, unlike many top students, Brian’s success story did not start when he joined form one.

Brian had a difficult time transitioning from the easy life of day primary school to the comparatively harsh boarding life.

“One Sunday when he was in Form One, he came home and said he did not want to return to Alliance because life was too fast there,” recalls his mother.

However, Brian’s parents took a firm stance and maintained their decision that he stays at Alliance Boys.

Both parents say that they kept encouraging their son, visiting him at least every two weeks to find out how he was doing.

“Brian was a very hardworking and a selfless student who gave his time to the other students,” remarks Maina Nguru, a long-serving teacher at the school, who also taught Brian’s father.

Brian wants to pursue a double major in Biomedical Engineering and Software Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

KCSE 2017 Results: Enroll all secondary school students into NHIF, Uhuru directs

President Uhuru Kenyatta has directed Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i to work with Ministry of Health to enroll all the 3 million secondary school students into National Health Insurance Fund with effect January next year.

President Uhuru Kenyatta was speaking at State House, Nairobi when he received the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) 2017 results.

Matiang’i at the same promised that the President’s directive would be executed immediately further indicating that proposals were already in place regarding the same.

In November, the government announced that all students in public schools will have medical cover paid for by the Government. The Government further announced a 1,999 shillings per child per year allocation under the medical and insurance allocation.

Parents will however not contribute any monies towards this program. Currently, schools have their own medical and insurance arrangements.

President Kenyatta receives KCSE results 2017

President Kenyatta was today briefed on this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) results by Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i and his team.

CS Matiang’i said the results are showing a normal curve as reforms in the exam system are entrenched.

President Kenyatta directed CS Matiang’i and the head of the Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC), Prof. George Magoha to institutionalise the reforms so that the achievement made in the last few years is maintained.

The President also asked the Teachers Service Commission (TSC) to reward principals, schools and subject teachers who excelled to promote continued high performance. But similarly, President Kenyatta said teachers caught cheating should be punished severely to serve as an example to others.

President Kenyatta also directed CS Matiangi to work with Attorney General Githu Muigai to make presentations to the DPP so that cases of cheating involving more than 700 teachers countrywide are expedited.

As part of the President’s Big Four growth agenda, President Kenyatta directed Matiangi to work with the Ministry of Health to enroll all 3 million secondary school students into the NHIF programme with effect from January 2018.

Matiangi was due to release the results to the public at Nairobi School Wednesday morning.

Present were TSC Secretary Nancy Macharia, KNEC Chairman George Magoha and Education PS Belio Kipsang.

KCSE results 2017 won’t be released on Monday, says Knec

Updated: 18.12.2017

The examination council has dismissed as false reports on social media that indicated KCSE results will be released on Monday  (18.12.2017).

KNEC chairman Professor George Magoha said in a statement on Sunday the council will communicate the proper dates that the Education ministry will release the results.

Mogoha warned against the circulation of the false reports saying they are causing unnecessary anxiety among candidates and the public.

“The process of marking national examinations is sensitive that the council often carries out meticulously and without any external pressure. As soon as the process is complete, the Ministry of Education will use its official channels to announce the date and the time of releasing the KCSE results,” Magoha said.

The false reports had indicated that KNEC would brief President Uhuru Kenyatta about the results on Monday at 9am ahead of their release at 10am.

Earlier, communication from Knec indicated that the results would be released before end of this month.

Anxiety and fear as Matiang’i set to release KCSE results 2017 this week

Updated: 17.12.2017

Anxiety has gripped parents and students after indications emerged that this year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examination results could be released this week.

The Sunday Standard has established that by end of last week, only six centres were yet to complete marking, with most of the process complete.

Sources in Government said Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i was likely to release the results for the 615,773 candidates before Christmas Day.

“Be on the look-out because as things stand now, the remaining centres are about to complete marking and processing of marks will soon be done with,” said the source who is familiar with the process.

The official who spoke in confidence said compilation of most of the results was complete.

There are only seven days left to Christmas, with December 24 being a Sunday. This means the results are likely to be out between tomorrow and Saturday. A number of teachers who participated in the marking told the Sunday Standard that by last week most of the marking centres had been closed.

Parents and candidates yesterday expressed mixed reactions over the number of quality grades that the students would record this year.

Some said they expected last year’s trends to hold with a few quality grades, while others said they expected improved grades because of negligible examination irregularities registered in the examination.

“We are just waiting and hoping that results will improve this year because cases of cheating were isolated,” said a parent.

Parents and candidates’ fears could hold some weight going by an analysis of KCSE examination results for the last three years. The results released last year shocked many Kenyans as only 141 candidates scored the coveted grade ‘A’ compared to 2,685 who attained the grade in 2015.

Only 4,645 candidates scored grade A–, 10,975 attained B+ while 17,216 scored B plain. A total of 55,952 candidates scored B– and C+ in last year’s results.

Overall, only 88,929 candidates attained the university entry grade of C+ and above compared to 169,492 the previous year.

And of the top 20 best performing candidates nationally in last year’s examinations, 16 were girls.

KCSE Results 2017: Decline in performance

A look at last year’s KCSE results shows that 20 subjects recorded a decline in performance compared to 10 in 2015.

Art & Design, Computer Studies, Drawing & Design, Woodwork and Kenyan Sign Language were the most improved subjects.

A Ministry of Education report on KCSE examination performance between 2014-2016 reveals that the number of candidates who score grade A has continued to drop, with the lowest score recorded last year. The report is dated July 18, 2017.

The year 2014 recorded the highest number of students who scored grade A, with some 3,042 candidates posting the grade.

This came down to 2,685 in 2015 and only 141 last year.

The data also shows an increasing trend of poor grades, with some 557,911 candidates scoring grade D to E over the past three years.

Last year recorded the highest number of low grades with 295,463 candidates scoring grade D and below. This represented more than half the candidates (51.7 per cent) who sat the 2016 KCSE examination.

In 2015, some 133,885 candidates scored grade D and below, representing 25.6 per cent of the total candidature.

And 128,885 scored graded D and below in 2014, representing 26.9 per cent of the total candidates that year.

KCSE Results 2017: University entry grade

The scenario is the same for the total number of students who posted the minimum university entry grade for the last three years.

Last year again recorded the lowest number of those who scored C+ and above, with only 88,929, representing 15.6 per cent. In 2015, some 169,492­ managed the university entry grade, nearly double the number registered last year.

The year 2014 recorded the highest number of those who attained university entry grade at 159,370, representing 33.3 per cent.

Based on this trend, parents and candidates have a reason to worry as time ticks towards release of this year’s results.

The trend is also not steady for candidates who post middle level grades of C and D+.

Over the last three years, a total of 595,670 candidates scored grades C to D+.

Last year, 186,769 candidates managed grade C and D+ while 218,185 were recorded in 2015 and another 190,717 in 2014.

Source: The Standard

KCSE results 2017 to be released next week, says ministry official

Updated: 16.12.2017

The education ministry may release the KCSE results next week, an official has said. Examiners finished marking the tests this week and the Kenya National Examination Council is currently compiling the results.

Earlier, communication from the Knec indicated the exam results would be released before end of this month. The marking of the exam started immediately after the conclusion of the tests on December 3. It was being done in about 20 centres in Nairobi and its environs.

The source on Friday said that Education CS Fred Matiang’i is expected to present a brief of the results to President Uhuru Kenyatta at State House on Monday.

“About 200,000 papers were yet to be marked when this week began. This was a small number that was completed before the end of week and the results sent to the Knec headquarters.”

The announcement will come earlier than usual as promised by the CS to give way for admissions to universities. Previously, the exam agency released the results in late January or early February of the following year.

This year, 615,773 candidates sat KCSE exam in 9,350 centres, being a five per cent increase from last year’s 577,253 candidates. Of this, 1,404 were special needs students. The exam was conducted in what Matiang’i termed as ‘military precision’.

Examiners were restricted from taking away answer scripts, marking schemes or any marking materials from the marking rooms or centres. Those found violating the directive were to be dismissed and a report made for disciplinary action.

Source: The Star

KCSE Results 2017


Join us at Softkenya Group where we share our best Quotes, Stories, Poems, Excerpts, Sermons, Messages, Personal Experiences and Useful guides... The SOFTKENYA COMMUNITY --- Join us Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1217813621643464
Loading...